Tagged: insulin pumps

I Don’t Expect You To Know…

1436093_55811447My car runs on unleaded gas. It goes from point A to point B (and sometimes to point H when I don’t follow the GPS correctly) and it has an engine. I understand the basics of internal combustion and in my more adventurous youth, I even changed my spark plugs and oil on my own. (I think every woman every person should know how to do that.)

I drive it with the knowledge that I don’t know everything about how a car works. I watch Top Gear (the U.K. version, of course), but that does not make me a gear head. There’s a lot I don’t understand about cars.

I’m not expected to know; that’s why expert mechanics exist. If it makes a funny noise or squeals as I brake, I take it to someone who can diagnose the issue and hopefully fix it without putting me into hock. Even people who change my car’s oil may not understand how the engine works or what that funny noise is.

Replace car with diabetes and other appropriate phrases related to a disease. (Heck, if you want to go for broke, you can replace car with any major illness.)

Now re-read those first two paragraphs.

I Don’t Expect You To Know…

I don’t expect you to know how diabetes works (or doesn’t work). There’s a lot of moving parts to the intricate dance we do each day to get from Point A to Point B (and we sometimes end up at Point H without any idea of how we got there). I don’t expect you to know how I feel when my blood sugar is crashing to the floor or soaring towards the ceiling; my symptoms and side effects are unique (although many share the same symptoms and side effects). I don’t expect anyone to know what the diagnosis signs are or how they can help me, and millions of other people, live well.

All of this to say: Let’s stop berating others if they don’t know about diabetes, especially those in the medical field. Sounds crazy, right?

“What do you mean the ER nurse didn’t know what a CGM is?”

“The optometrist asked you what your blood sugar was this morning?”

“The doctor wanted to take your insulin pump off in the hospital?”

“The LPN told you that she has diabetes, too, when she saw your medical alert bracelet, but that hers wasn’t severe?”

“The nurse said that they’d give you insulin just when you eat, but no basal insulin at all?”

We are the experts…

We are the experts. We live with this disease 24/7/365 ad infinitum. Most of the medical world hasn’t had more than a mention of diabetes in a class for their certification or degree (with the exception being CDEs and endocrinologists). Are you amazed at that?

This is the curriculum for a BS degree in Nursing at NYU. There isn’t a single “Diabetes” class in their four year program, either as requirements or electives. Would it shock you to learn that, according to a Diabetes Care journal article in 1990, 20% of nursing faculty surveyed said that their students had 0 to 8 hours of clinical experience with diabetes patients during their education? (And most of those patients were over the age of 65?)

269548_4087We have a choice…

When we encounter someone (in the medical field or in public) who doesn’t understand what diabetes is or has a misperception of what we do every day, we have a choice. We can express incredulity at their lack of knowledge and become defensive about our disease, or… we can educate them. 

“The ER nurse didn’t know what a CGM is?”

Nope, because when she went to school, CGMs didn’t exist. And really, the majority of people with Type 1 diabetes don’t use (or don’t have access to use) a continuous glucose monitor. So, those who do use them are a subset of a subset of a large group of people with diabetes. A simple explanation of what a CGM does and how it helps you prevent hypoglycemic or hyperglycemic episodes can go a long way to not only educate that ER nurse, but perhaps create an ally or future advocate in the ER for diabetes.

“The optometrist asked you what your blood sugar was this morning?”

Yep, because even if you put that you’re Type 1 on your intake form, they don’t know how often you check. You can simply smile, explain that while you checked this morning, you’ve also checked twice (or six times!) since then. You can talk about the difference between Type 1 and Type 2 and that all people with diabetes can get the same eye complications. (Retinopathy and macular edema doesn’t discriminate between types.)

“The doctor wanted to take off your insulin pump in the hospital?”

If you’re wearing an insulin pump, you may know more about diabetes than that doctor. You can begin a dialog as to why the insulin pump needs to be removed. They may not understand the technology - and it’s up to you to explain that your pump supplies a basal rate and boluses when needed. However, if you’re in the hospital because of DKA or a severe hypoglycemic episode, the pump may be the issue. Have the conversation - a two-way conversation - and ask that your endocrinologist or a hospital endocrinologist be brought in to consult.

(Side note: That all being said, if you encounter an endo or a CDE who doesn’t understand the basic mechanics of diabetes, please run, do not walk, out of that office.)

When people say things that make you angry because it’s clear that they don’t understand diabetes, take a breath and remind yourself that you didn’t know much (if at all) about this disease before you were diagnosed. It’s frustrating when you encounter someone in the medical field who may not understand, especially because they are dealing with you. They just haven’t been taught. Yet.

Teach…

We can’t expect anyone to know, but we can expect everyone to learn. And if we want everyone to learn, then it’s up to us to be knowledgeable about diabetes and the devices that we use. We should be able to explain in simple terms and invite questions. We should be able to ask our own questions and be our own advocate. We should be able to smile and talk about the differences between types of diabetes and explain that there are more that the types have in common than separate them.

We won’t change the world overnight, but imagine if you could calmly explain the disease to someone and walk away knowing that they’re a little more knowledgeable about diabetes? Or give them websites so that they can learn more?

Sounds crazy, right?

Let’s be crazy.

 

 

 

As A Jaybird

1051853_45298648Naked.

Completely naked.

As a jaybird. (That’s a saying that I heard as a kid, and here’s the saying’s origin.)

It’s rare that I get to be completely naked. You know what I mean. No insertion set. No CGM sensor. Nothing extra to hold or unconsciously shield against doorway scrapes or zippers.

I change my insertion sets every three days and my CGM sensor every ::mumble mumble:: (as long as I can get it to last, but you know, officially it’s seven days…), so it’s not often that both attached to my body items are missing.

I had snuggled under the covers, having done my last BG check of the day and put my Dexcom receiver next to my head. As I slid my arm under my pillow, I felt the tape give way.

“&$#(*^*!”

It was a beautiful run with this sensor (not just for the beautiful graphs for the past weeks, but accurate from start to untimely demise). Nighttime lows are becoming less frequent (and less severe) for me, although I tend to skim the bottom line of my low alert if I’m not careful. Having the Dexcom off my body at night is foreign these days, but I was cozy and comfy and sleepy. The Kid woke me up at 3am. She acted as my backup CGM (she just didn’t know it) and I sucked a juice box down and woke up at 74.

Raise your hand if you feel strange too when you rip that insertion set off your body before a shower!

There’s a moment of “I have nothing foreign on or in my body.”

There’s a moment of “It’s just me.”

There’s a moment of “This is what it used to feel like all the time.”

Then there’s a moment of “I’m glad I have the tech that I do have.”

The stars align sometimes and I feel free from the physical burden of diabetes technology that keeps me safe and healthy and alive.

I also feel naked without them.

As a jaybird.

Diabetes & Taxes

90376_1582Death, taxes… diabetes. We’re all certain that until there is a cure, we’ve definitely got diabetes and have to pay our taxes (at least in the United States). Don’t we already bleed enough?

When you have a very expensive chronic illness (hint: diabetes is a very expensive chronic illness), it pays to be prepared when it comes to doing your taxes and squeezing every dime out of your medical deduction. You need to begin the hunt for your expenses - and the receipts for those expenses.

Topic 502 of the IRS is all about Medical and Dental Expenses. We all need to know about this topic. Here’s the deal if you itemize your expenses on your 1040:

For years beginning after December 31, 2012, you may deduct only the amount of your total medical expenses that exceed 10% of your adjusted gross income or 7.5% if you or your spouse is 65 or older. The 7.5% limitation is a temporary exemption starting January 1, 2021 to December 31, 2020 for individuals age 65 and older and their spouses.

It Pays To Itemize

It pays to itemize. Seriously. Plain and simple: we spend a lot of our diabetes care, but we don’t think about all of the items. (And a lot of the time, we don’t keep the receipts…)

I’m telling you this: start now. Even if you didn’t keep the receipts from last year, start collecting. If you’re high tech, scan them in somewhere. Take a picture of your receipts and put them in a file on your computer. Heck, get a folder and put it next to your keys and put any receipts that can be included as medical/dental expenses into it. Find a system that works for you. But start now.

Ground Rules

I AM NOT A TAX PROFESSIONAL. Oh, please. I have a BA degree and a MSc. degree, neither of which is in accounting. You know (hopefully) by now how much I do not like math. I use a bolus calculator for a reason. I have wonderful friends who are CPAs. Do not look to me for tax advice. Do not look to me as the shining pillar of how to do taxes. I am many things, but I am not a tax professional nor am I perfect. (I am The Perfect D, but…)

I’m not giving you the entire list of what are considered acceptable deductible medical expenses. If you want the whole list, you can get it from the IRS website.

Here are the ground rules for what you can deduct:

  • You can only include the medical expenses you paid during the year and you can only use the expenses once on the return.
  • If you got reimbursed for any medical expenses, you must reduce the expense by the amount you were reimbursed.

For instance: You paid a doctor $120 for an appointment in May of 2014, sent the receipt into your insurance, and they sent you a check for $100 in December of 2014. You can then only claim $20 for this 2014 expense on your taxes, because you paid only $20 to see the doctor. 

What You Can Deduct If You Have Diabetes

Deductible diabetes medical expenses may include (but are not limited) to:

Your payments to your healthcare team: physicians, CDEs, nutritionists, dietitians, psychiatrists, psychologists, endocrinologists, nephrologists, podiatrists, cardiologists, physical therapists, chiropractors, and “non-traditional medical practitioners”, including acupuncture for smoking cessation, and massage therapists when used for a medical condition.

Your prescriptions/insulin. Anything that you have a prescription for, you can list as a medical expense. And… even if you don’t have a prescription for insulin, it’s still a medical expense that is covered. That includes your pump and all supplies. Your insulin pens and syringes and cartridges. If it helps you get the drug into your body, it’s a medical expense that can be deducted.

Your meter and blood glucose testing supplies. (These are diagnostic devices and therefore, covered. Same goes for your CGM and sensors. Ketone test strips (urine or blood).

291573_5192Your medical supplies. Yeah, you’re thinking, of course. But medical supplies include: alcohol swabs, IV Prep 3000, Band-Aids, etc.

Your eyeglasses or contact lenses. If you have contact lenses, you can deduct the cost of the enzyme cleaners and daily cleaning solutions. Don’t forget to include your eye exam, even if it was a refraction/non-dilated exam. That’s included.

Dental treatments at the dentist’s office, including cleanings and fillings. (You cannot expense floss, toothbrushes, or toothpaste.)

Your guide dog expenses, including grooming and food and vet fees. 

Your lab fees. Your ambulance fees or ER fees or hospital stay. All of it is covered. They’ll send you receipts. You’ll weep at seeing how much they charge.

Your lodging for medical care (up to $50 per person per night) (meals not included), if:

  1. The lodging is primarily for and essential to medical care.
  2. The medical care is provided by a doctor in a licensed hospital or in a medical care facility related to, or the equivalent of, a licensed hospital.
  3. The lodging is not lavish or extravagant under the circumstances.
  4. There is no significant element of personal pleasure, recreation, or vacation in the travel away from home.

Your cost of special dietary considerations (i.e. celiac disease - and you must click on that link and read this post from one of my favorite bloggers) or costs for participation in a weight-loss program after an obesity diagnosis) when prescribed by a doctor. Don’t try to deduct health club dues. Nope.

Your admission/registration costs AND travel expenses for a chronically ill person or spouse or a parent of a chronically ill kid to attend a medical conference to learn about new medical treatments. (You can’t deduct meals or lodging while attending the conference.) Hello? Friends for Life? AADE or ADA? Ahem. Deductible medical expenses. Holla. 

Your Electronic Health Records cost to keep all your data in one place. Also known as a “medical information plan” or a “personal electronic health record.”

1442111_98999959Your transportation costs to and from medical appointments/hospitals/medical centers. Don’t forget tolls, parking, gas, oil… Straight from the IRS:

Payments for transportation primarily for and essential to medical care that qualify as medical expenses, such as payments of the actual fare for a taxi, bus, train, ambulance, or for medical transportation by personal car, the amount of your actual out-of-pocket expenses such as for gas and oil, or the amount of the standard mileage rate for medical expenses, plus the cost of tolls and parking fees.

Some of your health insurance premiums. I’m not going to get into this one, as it’s a minefield of what you can and cannot deduct. You need to look at the IRS website on this particular subset.

What You Can’t Deduct

One of the things that I wish could be covered is hypoglycemia recovery supplies (i.e. glucose tabs, juice, etc.). I’m doing everything that I can to keep that cost to a minimum, but really… we all probably spend far too much on that, and it’s not reimbursable. (Not unless you have a prescription written by your doctor for “juice”…)

You can’t deduct the cost of the cell phone plans and minutes calling your insurance company to argue over what is covered and what isn’t.

You can’t medically deduct the cost of your Internet service plan for the time you spend getting peer to peer support online from the DOC.

You can’t deduct the over-the-counter salves and moisturizers to keep our pretty diabetic feet from cracking or drying out.

Hopefully I’ve triggered something in your brain that says: “I can deduct that?! Booya!” Start preparing now for the 2014 tax season. (I’m quite aware that U.S. taxes are not due until April 15th, but don’t wait until the 15th to think about all the items that you can add together for your medical expense deductions… you’ll get overwhelmed and you’ll inevitably miss something.)

Happy deduction hunting! 

 

 

 

Need Help With U.S. Diabetes Supplies and Medications?

159942_2191For anyone who has diabetes, the cost of staying alive is expensive.

This is a current list of currently available programs, co-pay cards, organizations and manufacturers that may help, and the requirements to participate in the programs.

Why did I create this?

Every other “diabetes financial assistance/resource” page that I would visit would give you a link to supposed help - but you had to dig deep to find out if there were exclusions or restrictions. Some of the resource pages had links that no longer exist. Others had a single page that said: “We no longer offer a program.” (And I’m talking major diabetes organizations and manufacturers… they’re not keeping their own pages up to date…)

This page will give you the restrictions/exclusions I’ve found and the contact information and site to get yourself started if you qualify. (And in some cases, all of us will qualify!)

These links are up to date and I will be adding additional resources as they are made available. (If you have links or resources, please list them in the comment section and if they’re legitimate, I’ll add them.)

Right now, you’ll see a glaring absence of blood glucose monitoring supplies. Every link I researched ended with a dead end. Roche/Accu-Chek does offer a free Aviva or Nano meter on their site, but there are no programs currently offered for free/discounted strips. If this changes, I’ll let you know. (And not five minutes after posting this, Megan helped our community by giving us our first program for test strips/meters. That’s what community is all about!)

Hope this helps you.

Share it if you please - no one should be “sick” with diabetes from a lack of medication or supplies - let’s help each other by getting the word out. 

Diabetes Medications & Needles

Eli Lilly

Eli Lilly offers Humalog, Humalin, and Humalog Mix under the Lilly Cares program.

  • You must be a U.S. resident.
  • You must not have prescription coverage.
  • You must meet the household guidelines:

Household Income Guidelines:

  • The total number of people in the household includes yourself and each of your dependents.
  • Total yearly income includes incomes from all earners in your household before taxes and deductions.
  • To qualify, your total yearly income cannot exceed the values listed below.

 

Number of People in Your Home 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8
Total Yearly Income
(48 Contiguous States and DC)
$36,000 $48,000 $60,000 $72,000 $84,000 $96,000 $109,000 $121,000
Alaska $44,000 $59,000 $75,000 $90,000 $105,000 $120,000 $136,000 $151,000
Hawaii $41,000 $55,000 $69,000 $83,000 $97,000 $111,000 $125,000 $139,000

 

For additional information about Lilly Cares, call at 1-800-545-6962.

*A 120-day supply of medicine will be shipped to your health care provider’s office. Prescription refills will be available during your 1-year enrollment period.

GlaxoSmithKline

Avandia may be available at a reduced cost or for free. Unfortunately, the qualifications are not listed. You must call 1-866-GSK-FOR-U (1-866-475-3678).

NovoNordisk

Novo Nordisk Patient Assistance Program (PAP) provides free medicine (to those who qualify), including: Levemir, Novolog, Novolog Mix 70/30, Novolin, GlucaGen Hypo Kit, Victoza, and disposable needles for FlexPens and Victoza.

The application for Novo Nordisk’s medication assistance program is downloadable here. 

  • There are several limitations to this program. Review the application for all the restrictions.
  • You must be a U.S. citizen.
  • Patients must have a household income less than 200% of federal poverty level.

You can get more information by calling the Novo Nordisk Patient Assistance Program toll free at 866-310-7549.

If approved, a free 120-day supply of medicine will be sent to the prescribing health care providers’ office to be picked up at the patient’s convenience. Novo Nordisk will automatically contact the health care provider 90 days later to approve the medication reorder.

Merck Helps

Merck offers a prescription assistance program for Januvia.

  • You do not have to be a US citizen. Legal residents of the United States, including US Territories, are also eligible.
  • Your prescription for a Merck medicine from a health care provider licensed in the United States.*
  • You do not have insurance or other coverage for your prescription medicine. Some examples of other insurance coverage include private insurance, HMOs, Medicaid, Medicare, state pharmacy assistance programs, veterans assistance, or any other social service agency support.
  • You may qualify for the program if you have a household income of $46,680 or less for individuals, $62,920 or less for couples, or $95,400 or less for a family of 4.

The application for this program must be downloaded, filled out, and brought to your medical provider. Click here for the Merck Helps application.  (It is also available in Spanish.)

If you don’t meet the criteria, you can also try and use the “Januvia copay assistance coupon”. 

Januvia’s coupon is for “as little as $5 per prescription” for up to 12 months. Here’s the information on the restrictions and what you’d need to do. 

Pfizer

If you use Glucotrol, Pfizer offers a discount card for individuals who have NO prescription coverage. You’ll need to call 866-706-2400 to apply. 

  • You must be prescribed a Pfizer medicine available at a savings.
  • Have no prescription coverage.
  • Live in the United States, Puerto Rico, or the U.S. Virgin Islands

They also offer free medication for uninsured individuals through some clinics and hospitals. You can see if there is one located near you by entering your zip code at this website. 

Sanofi- Apidra

Those who take Apidra can use the Apidra® No Co-Pay Savings Program with their Apidra® prescription payments. Activate your card by checking this box and you can get No Co-Pay* on Apidra®. If you’re registering someone under the age of 18, please call 855-242-6938.

  • The card is not valid for prescriptions purchased under Medicaid, Medicare, or similar federal, state, or other government funded benefit programs.
  • Only patients who reside in the United States or Puerto Rico can participate in this program.
  • All commercially insured patients are eligible, even those with insurance that places Apidra® on the 3rd tier.
  • Cash-paying patients are also eligible for a benefit of up to $100 off per prescription.

Sanofi - Lantus

Sanofi offers a discount card for those who use Lantus SoloStar - pay no more than $25 for up to 3 prescriptions. (Maximum $100 benefit off of each prescription, for up to $300 for three prescriptions.)

  • The card is not valid for prescriptions purchased under Medicaid, Medicare, or similar federal, state, or other government funded benefit programs.
  • Only patients who reside in the United States or Puerto Rico can participate in this program.
  • All commercially insured patients are eligible.

Patient Access Network Foundation

The Patient Access Network (PAN) Foundation, an independent, national 501 (c)(3) organization dedicated to providing underinsured patients with co-payment assistance through more than 60 disease-specific programs that give them access to the treatments they need.

Diabetic Foot Ulcers

Eligibility Criteria

  •  Patient should be insured and insurance must cover the medication for which patient seeks assistance.
  •  The medication must treat the disease directly.
  •  Patient must reside and receive treatment in the United States.
  •  Patient’s income must fall below 400% of the Federal Poverty Level. (Here’s the handy chart showing you what that is based on how many people are in your household.)

Diabetic Macular Edema

Eligibility Criteria

  •  Patient should be insured and insurance must cover the medication for which patient seeks assistance.
  •  The medication must fight the disease directly.
  •  Patient must reside and receive treatment in the United States.
  •  Patient’s income must fall below 500% of the Federal Poverty Level. (You can use the chart and do the calculations for 500%. For instance, if you are a household of one, you qualify if you earn less than $48,350 gross income annually. For a household of three, you qualify if the household earns less than $98,950.)

Kidney Transplant Immunosuppressants 

Eligibility Criteria

  •  Patient should be insured and insurance must cover the medication for which patient seeks assistance.
  •  The medication must fight the disease directly.
  •  Patient must reside and receive treatment in the United States.
  •  Patient’s income must fall below 500% of the Federal Poverty Level. (You can use the chart and do the calculations for 500%. For instance, if you are a household of one, you qualify if you earn less than $48,350 gross income annually. For a household of three, you qualify if the household earns less than $98,950.)

Solid Organ Transplant Immunosuppressant Therapy

This will cover pancreas transplants and kidney-pancreas transplants.

Eligibility Criteria

  •  Patient should be insured and insurance must cover the medication for which patient seeks assistance.
  •  The medication must treat the disease directly.
  •  Patient must reside and receive treatment in the United States.
  •  Patient’s income must fall below 400% of the Federal Poverty Level. (Here’s the handy chart showing you what that is based on how many people are in your household.)

Retinal Vein Occlusion (RVO)

From the Patient Access Network Foundation website:

Central and branch retinal vein occulusions (RVO) happen when the vein at the back of the eye is blocked. This blockage causes pressure build and some of the small blood vessels in the eye may burst and cause fluid to leak into the retina. If untreated the vessels may be able to repair themselves and bypass the blockage but there may be permanent damage to the retina resulting in vision loss. 

Eligibility Criteria

  •  Patient should be insured and insurance must cover the medication for which patient seeks assistance.
  •  The medication must fight the disease directly.
  •  Patient must reside and receive treatment in the United States.
  •  Patient’s income must fall below 500% of the Federal Poverty Level. (You can use the chart and do the calculations for 500%. For instance, if you are a household of one, you qualify if you earn less than $48,350 gross income annually. For a household of three, you qualify if the household earns less than $98,950.)

 

Healthwell Foundation

For children under eighteen years of age

HealthWell Pediatric Assistance Fund® assists children 18 years old or younger living with a chronic or life-altering condition that their families are struggling to treat due to cost. They provide financial assistance to families so their children can start or continue critical medical treatments, including diabetes.

Families must meet HealthWell’s standard income and insurance eligibility criteria to qualify for a grant. Grants are awarded on a case by case basis. To apply for a grant, call 1-800-675-8416 anytime Monday through Friday, 9:00 a.m. to 5:00 p.m. (ET).

  • You must have some form of health insurance (major medical or prescription drug) that covers part of the cost of your medication.
  • Families with incomes up to 400 percent of the Federal Poverty Level may qualify. HealthWell also considers the cost of living in a particular city or state.
  • If you appear to be eligible for assistance through the Pediatric Assistance Fund, additional information and documentation is required for review and consideration prior to grant approval. Once all information has been received and reviewed by the committee, grant determinations will be made.
  • You will be asked to provide the Foundation with the patient’s diagnosis, which must be verified by a physician, nurse practitioner, or physician assistant’s signature. The patient must receive treatment in the United States.

Immunosuppressive Treatment for Solid Organ Transplant Recipients

HealthWell will pay for the following medications for immunosuppressive therapy:

Astagraf XL, Cellcept, Gengraf, Hecoria, Imuran, Myfortic, Neoral, Nulojix, Prograf, Rapamune, Sandimmune, and Zortress.

  • You must have some form of health insurance (major medical or prescription drug) that covers part of the cost of your medication.
  • Families with incomes up to 400 percent of the Federal Poverty Level may qualify. HealthWell also considers the cost of living in a particular city or state.

You can apply online for this medication grant here.  or call 800-675-8416. Agents are available Monday–Friday 9am–5pm EST.

Insulin Pumps

Medtronic MiniMed

The Medtronic Financial Assistance Program offers help to those who:

  • Use an insulin pump and/or continuous glucose monitoring
  • Meet specific income guidelines
  • Have an insurance company that allows for additional assistance

It also provides temporary coverage for specific situations:

  • Unemployment within the last 12 months
  • Gap in insurance coverage because of a pre-existing condition
  • Multiple pumpers in one household
  • Permanent disability

You’ll need to call Medtronic 1-800-646-4633 and select option 4 to get specific information.

Other pump companies offer self-funding payment programs. You should call them individually to find out the particulars. (The plans may change based on what you are looking for…)

*** If you have information regarding insulin pump programs, please contact me via email at theperfectd [at] gmail.com - you’ll be helping us all out!***

Equipment

Charles Ray III Diabetes Association

The CR3 Diabetes Association, Inc. is a 501(c)3 non-profit organization. 

According to the website, the organization is currently accepting applications for insulin pumps, blood glucose meters, and blood glucose test strips. You must review the following criteria:

  • You are uninsured
  • You are under insured (which means that your yearly deductible is unattainable)
  • Household income is less than $60,000
  • Your physician has recommended insulin pump therapy for you

They will only accept online applications on their website. The link to the online application is here.

Supplies for CWD Foundation (For children aged 18 years and younger)

Supplies for CWD Foundation (SCWDF) is a branch of the Children with Diabetes Foundation, a non-profit 501(c)(3) organization, providing short-term (up to three months) diabetes supplies for children with type 1 diabetes who are in emergency situations. (An emergency situation may be defined as: loss of health insurance, loss of a parent’s job, or a local disaster, combined with the family having no other resources with which to purchase diabetes supplies.)

Diabetes supplies is defined as any of the following: blood glucose meter, blood glucose test strips, insulin, insulin pump supplies, blood or urine ketone strips, lancets, syringes, and glucose tablets.

Download and fill out this application after reviewing all the requirements on the website.

Blood Glucose Meters/Test Strips

Freestyle Promise Program - $15 copays and a free Abbott Freestyle meter.

  • Co-pay assistance is not valid for prescriptions reimbursed under Medicare, Medicaid, or similar federal or state programs or in Massachusetts.
  • Eligible patients are responsible for the first $15 of co-pay under their insurance coverage, and can receive up to a maximum of $50 in co-pay savings. Uninsured patients are also eligible for savings in most situations.

Contour Choice Program - For ContourNext test strips. Eligible patients pay the first $15 in co-pays each month. Insured patients can receive savings of up to $35 per month of co-pays using the Contour Choice Card.

Not valid for patients with prescription benefits covered by federal and/or state government programs (e.g. Medicare, Medicaid.)

Clinical Trials

Do not forget about participating in clinical trials, some of which provide monetary compensation in addition to supplies and medications at no cost. (Some also provide physician/medical visits!)

Please seriously consider participating in these trials - in some, you can get access to pumps or medications that would not be available to you due to cost - or FDA approval. And… you can help others (and yourself) through clinical trials.

Click here for a list of clinical trials for diabetes that are recruiting  (general, which include both Type 1, Type 2, LADA, MODY, and gestational).

 

 

Any other sites/supplies/organizations/medication programs that might be helpful to others? Help us!

Medtronic CareLink and Browsers of Yesterday

516892_68656024On the FAQ pages of Carelink. it plainly states:

Which web browsers can be used to access CareLink Personal software?

The system is currently validated to work with Microsoft® Internet Explorer® version 7, 8 and 9, Internet Explorer 10 Desktop, Apple® Safari® 4, 5 and 6, and Mozilla® Firefox® 5.0.1. Other browsers might still work although Medtronic Diabetes is not able to guarantee proper operation of those browsers.

 

I use a Mac. (According to Dexcom, I’m already a complete loser, as their CGM software won’t even run on a Mac unless you use a PC emulator program.) I have two browsers downloaded on my system: Safari (which comes standard on most Macs) and Firefox (which is easily downloaded and what I use occasionally for some banking transactions that demand Firefox).

I know that CareLink works on a Mac, because I’ve uploaded my pump data before on this laptop. So, the other evening, when I needed to upload data so that my trainer and I could look at it together while talking on the phone to adjust settings, I thought it would be easy.

I got this screen when I went to Medtronic’s CareLink link on their website:

Screen Shot of Safari Browser

My Safari was “too up-to-date”, so I couldn’t access CareLink through that browser.

Well, shoot. OK. Fine. I’ll fire up the Firefox browser I have… Version 21. (Not Firefox 5.)

Too up-to-date.

And by the way, if I wanted to download Internet Explorer right now, it’s IE 10 - or 11. And wait, they don’t have a version for Mac.

Frustration

If I didn’t have an amazing husband who is a web developer and happened to be home and was willing to sacrifice a pocket protector to the Geek God, I would have been not been able to upload my data. (He somehow configured something and magically, I have a Firefox browser that is…workable.)

I was able to examine the data that I uploaded, but I can’t imagine how frustrating it must be for others who expect that along with the latest technology they get from Medtronic, they get an upload system that will only work with the browsers of yesterday.

Yes, I expressed my opinion to the support team at Medtronic. I was polite, but I did use the phrase: “Unacceptable.” People who know me smile, as that means I’m pretty angry.

Will they do anything? Time will tell, which is pretty much been my phrase about this experience. What I do know is that it takes just one web developer to fix it and make sure that it works with all systems when there is an upgrade… I’m sure they can spare someone in their IT department.

Like I told you before, Medtronic, while allowing me to trial the system and all that comes with it, does not expect that everything I say will be rainbows and glitter about my experience.

The diabetes community talks incessantly (and I believe, sometimes to the wall) about the crucial need for integrated technology to make our lives easier to manage our diabetes. The Medtronic MiniMed 530G with Enlite is an integrated pump and continuous glucose monitor (and that threshold suspend, which I’ll write about soon… promise), but it’s an utter fail if you can’t use the browser… or two browsers…. or system… that you have to review the data and reports. Fail. (It’s not just Medtronic… Dexcom has failed me, too.) What good is the data if you can’t get to it?

Parting Thought

Heads up, Medtronic IT department. Please update your CareLink application and browser compatibility. (I’m not going to even talk about Chrome, which you supposedly don’t support at all…)

P.S. I’ll write about the actual reports that CareLink provides in another post. They do deserve a post of their own. But jeez.

Come. On.