You Deserve More Than Roses…

1526731_10153042281067328_1047114686242280778_nI hear her laughter and my heart swells with love.

I cannot imagine my life without my daughter.

I cannot imagine my life without the insulin that keeps me alive so that I can hear her laughter.

And yet… there are children in the world who do not have access to the insulin that will keep them alive.

No laughter.

No life.

No more. 

In parts of the world (some closer to the U.S. than you think), there is a problem getting insulin to children.

Lack of access to insulin remains the most common cause of death in a child with diabetes (Gale, 2006). The estimated life expectancy of a child who has just developed diabetes could be less than a year in some areas (Beran et al, 2005). Many die undiagnosed, others through lack of insulin or lack of expert care. In some countries, expert care is available but resources are limited and so early and serious complications frequently lead to death in young adulthood. – IDF

We know that insulin is expensive in the United States, but for some families in the world, the cost of insulin is more than a family will make in an entire year. And you know what can change that?

Us. 

roseFor the past few years, the Spare A Rose, Save A Child online campaign has helped to raise funds for the International Diabetes Federation (IDF)’s Life for a Child campaign.

Life for a Child began over a decade ago and gives donor funds directly to diabetes centers around the world, getting children insulin, test strip supplies, and care to help these children live… and laugh.

How Can You Help?

Valentine’s Day is coming.

Flowers are pretty. Chocolates are nice. Perfume smells lovely (Sometimes.)

But flowers wither. Chocolates get eaten. Perfume wafts away into the air.

You deserve more than that. 

Five dollars.

The cost of a single rose. Or a very expensive piece of chocolate. Or a few spritzes of perfume. (Or even that teddy bear that gets purchased at the gas station on the way home.) Five dollars gives a child with diabetes in an underdeveloped country a month of life.

Let those who love you know that you’ll take one less rose. One less piece of chocolate. Skip the spritz. You want them to give five dollars (or more) to the Spare A Rose, Save A Child campaign.

You can have them donate once or… they can remind you that you are loved throughout the year with a monthly gift to the program. You get a sweet acknowledgment and the knowledge that you are helping people all over the world hear a child laugh.

Want to get your office in on the action? Done. Easy-peasy-give-insulin-to-kids-squeezy.

Your donation is tax-deductible. (So, for those of you who are romantic AND financially savvy… you can say I love you and write it off. It’s still sexy.)

What About People YOU Love?

And of course, think about the people YOU love. You can donate in their name, then print out this card (or the other one) to let them know you love them more than roses.

You love them more than life itself. 

Click here to give life for a child. 

full

 

Bedtime Bribery With Stitches

Being an e-patient is one thing. Being an actual patient is another.

My finger is detriggered. You would think that after four of these (actually five, but one got done twice) surgeries, I would remember that the healing process takes time…and painkillers are needed to do the exercises to get my finger to fully extend. What I do remember is that it is so important to do the exercises, as much as it hurts, because otherwise… you can negate the whole purpose of the trigger release.

It’s a few days post-surgery and The Kid has developed a fascination with my stitches. I have stooped to use them for bribery. “If you put your pajamas on, you can look at them.” Anything to speed up bedtime.

The world continues to revolve while I am recuperating, so as I gather thoughts about last week (I was up in DC and have a head full of good things to share), I’ll give you some tidbits that you should know about:

  • Kim Vlasnik made me cry. Not the Victorian-dab-your-eye-with-an-embroidered-hankerchief quiet cry, but a keening, gasping, aching cry. Her MedX talk captured the essence of what endures beyond the physical and why our community is important. I want to thrust my iPhone at strangers and shout: “Watch her. Listen to her. This. This.”

 

  • WDD Treasure Hunt webpageLike treasure hunts? The International Diabetes Federation apparently does and is giving prizes out as a run-up to World Diabetes Day (November 14th). Here’s the details.  You get pins, bracelets, t-shirts, and bragging rights.
  • Yes, it’s almost Diabetes Awareness Month. Much like every year, we will begin to see posts from well-known organizations about the disease and people getting angry that this building and that building won’t light up blue for diabetes when they lit up pink the month before for breast cancer. Here’s a tip: take that anger and put it towards what YOU can do to help raise awareness or advocate for you, your family, or strangers with diabetes in your community or your government. We can light a candle or curse the darkness. You pick. Don’t know where to start? How about here. Or here.  Or create something all your own. Every voice matters. 
  • The World Diabetes Congress (which will be in Vancouver) is calling for abstracts, beginning in February. They are providing 100 grants to attend for individuals from all over the world, which includes the registration and travel costs. What’s my beef? You must be 40 years of age or younger. I’m sorry, but that’s NOT right. I get that there are bright, young individuals who have things to say and want to learn… but there are also those who happen to be over 40 (ahem) who also have things to say and want to learn. To attach an arbitrary cut off age like this is… unacceptable. Yes, I’m going to inquire. Yes, I have something to say about it.
  • Marjorie1Heroes sometimes wear shaggy coats. A Sweet Life, one of the best diabetes community media sources, is fundraising with Marjorie. Don’t know who she is? You need to know why she’s important to every.single.one.of.us. – and then help support A Sweet Life.

Off to do my hand exercises, which makes me look like I’m trying to channel The Bangles’ lead singer.

Walk Like An Egyptian.

 

 

How Do I Love Thee? Let Me Count The…Insulin Units.

roseI don’t believe that professions of love should be relegated to just one day.  I also don’t believe that children (or anyone) should die from Type 1 diabetes.

Do you agree? (At least about the diabetes issue.)

The DOC (Diabetes Online Community) agrees and we want to raise awareness (and donations), so that the International Diabetes Foundation’s program, Life of a Child, can give children with diabetes the true profession of love: life through insulin.

Life of a Child began over a decade ago and gives donor funds directly to diabetes centers around the world, allowing those centers to help children with clinical care. Over 12,000 children in 43 countries are given the gift of life through this essential program. But that’s not enough.

Lack of access to insulin remains the most common cause of death in a child with diabetes (Gale, 2006). The estimated life expectancy of a child who has just developed diabetes could be less than a year in some areas (Beran et al, 2005). Many die undiagnosed, others through lack of insulin or lack of expert care. In some countries, expert care is available but resources are limited and so early and serious complications frequently lead to death in young adulthood. – IDF

From as far away as the Solomon Islands to as close as Haiti and the Dominican Republic, children with diabetes need help. It’s atrocious to think that some children lose their lives because diabetes care is more than an entire family makes in a year.

Please consider donating the cost of a single rose ($5) to the Spare A Rose, Save A Child community effort. (Or more…) Your sweetheart still receives flowers and the knowledge that you both helped to save a life.

Spare A Rose, Save A Child
Click on this link, which will take you to the donation page of Spare A Rose, Save A Child.

Now, I know you’re asking… “So, I donated the money I would have spent on a rose (or a dozen roses, because you are totally amazing), but now what do I give my beloved?”

You give them a spiffy certificate – and you have your choice of two!

Card 1Card 2

A dozen roses doesn’t prove I love you… or Roses Are Red, My Face Just Smiled…

Both are adorable.

The goal this year is to raise $10,000. That’s a lot of roses. That’s a lot of love. That’s a lot of life.

Show your love to those you love and donate.

(And P.S.? Even if you can’t donate, would you share this with your friends on social media or email? It’s hard to love you more than I already do, but I can try, right? Thank you.)