7 Noteworthy Diabetes Clinical Trials Recruiting NOW…

elixir-1312949-639x468Clinical trials are the only way that we are going to get better treatments, better devices, and better…cures.

Here are seven noteworthy diabetes clinical trials recruiting now that you might want to look into and see if you (or anyone you know) might be eligible to volunteer.

Click on the titles of each trial to get more info straight from the ClinicalTrials.gov website. 

(Remember… some clinical trials may have you take a placebo in lieu of the investigational drug. Some clinical trials may require extra visits, invasive testing, and travel. You need to think about what the benefits and risks are for trial participation. That being said… nothing ventured, nothing gained.)

Repeat BCG Vaccinations for the Treatment of Established Type 1 Diabetes

The purpose of this study is to see if repeat bacillus Calmette-Guérin (BCG) vaccinations can confer a beneficial immune and metabolic effect on Type 1 diabetes. Published Phase I data on repeat BCG vaccinations in long term diabetics showed specific death of some of the disease causing bad white blood cells and also showed a short and small pancreas effect of restored insulin secretion. In this Phase II study, the investigators will attempt to vaccinate more frequently to see if these desirable effects can be more sustained.

Eligible volunteers will either be vaccinated with BCG in a repeat fashion over a period of four years or receive a placebo treatment. The investigators hypothesize that each BCG vaccination will eliminate more and more of the disease causing white blood cells that could offer relief to the pancreas for increased survival and restoration of insulin secretion from the pancreas.

If you’re interested and meet the criteria (and the location, as the trial is being conducted in Boston and requires weekly injections for the first year… don’t know if you can do this at home…), you should send an email to: diabetestrial@partners.org

This is Dr. Denise Faustman’s lab and website. Check out the details and what she’s doing.

Multiple Daily Injections and Continuous Glucose Monitoring in Diabetes (DIaMonD)

Evaluate if addition and use of real time continuous glucose monitoring (RT-CGM) improves glycemic outcome of patients using multiple daily injections (MDI) and self monitoring blood glucose (SMBG) testing, who are not at target glycemic control.

If you are on multiple daily injections, this might be a great opportunity to participate in a really interesting study if you are willing to wear a continuous glucose monitor (CGM) and possibly a pump. Check out the inclusion/exclusion criteria and locations, then send an email or call to either:

Eileen Casal, RN, MSN 858-875-9774 ecasal@dexcom.com
 David Price, MD 858-875-9525 dprice@dexcom.com

A Trial Comparing Continuous Glucose Monitoring With and Without Routine Blood Glucose Monitoring in Adults With Type 1 Diabetes (REPLACE-BG)

The primary objective of the study is to determine whether the routine use of Continuous Glucose Monitoring (CGM) without Blood Glucose Monitoring (BGM) confirmation is as safe and effective as CGM used as an adjunct to BGM.

This study will determine if we can actually make treatment decisions based on our CGM alone when we feel it is accurate, not verifying it with a finger-stick blood glucose check.

This. Is. Huge.

Why? Because one of the reasons why Medicare, Medicaid, and some insurance companies refuse to pay for a continuous glucose monitor, claiming it’s just an adjunct to a blood glucose meter and we still have to check to make treatment decisions. (And we know better, don’t we?) This trial has a lot of inclusion and exclusion criteria, but seriously… if you can do this, you will help the entire T1 diabetes community get access to this device.

Contact either person for more info:

 Katrina Ruedy, MSPH 813-975-8690 kruedy@jaeb.org
 Nhung “Leena” Nguyen, MPH, CCRP 813-975-8690 nnguyen@jaeb.org

Glucose Variability Pilot Study for the Abbott Sensor Based Glucose Monitoring System-Professional

This is to trial the Abbot Libre system, which is a sensor with “flash monitoring” for individuals with Type 2 diabetes. How cool is that? They currently need participants in the following locations: San Diego, Detroit, Kansas City, MO and Pearland, TX. If you meet the criteria, shoot Dr. Karinka an email for more info and get enrolled.

Shridhara Alva Karinka, Ph.D. 510-749-6393 shridhara.alva@abbott.com

A Study To Assess The Safety Of PF-06342674 In Adults With Type 1 Diabetes

If you are a newly diagnosed (within the last two years) adult (over 18), you can participate in a Phase 1 clinical trial for a biological drug, examining safety issues. Again, look at the criteria and locations, then if you are interested, call:

Pfizer CT.gov Call Center 1-800-718-1021

Please refer to this study by its ClinicalTrials.gov identifier: NCT02038764

In-Clinic Evaluation of the Predictive Low Glucose Management (PLGM) System in Adult and Pediatric Insulin Requiring Patients With Diabetes Using the Enlite 3 Sensor

This is a Medtronic study for their next step in the artificial pancreas technology pathway. (And hello… “Enlite 3 sensor!”)

All subjects will undergo hypoglycemic induction at Visit 2 with target set to 65 mg/dL using the rate of change basal increase algorithm. Low Limit setting when PLGM ON is 65 mg/dL.

The more patients willing to participate in artificial pancreas technology trials, the faster this technology will become available! Take a look at the locations and criteria and if you’re able to do this trial, contact:

Julie Sekella (818) 576-5171 julie.sekella@medtronic.com

Along those same lines…

Hybrid Closed Loop Pivotal Trial in Type 1 Diabetes

This is a BIG. DEAL. for people with diabetes in the United States. If on this trial, you get to wear the MMT-670G insulin pump, using it with the closed loop algorithm.

Closed Loop. Closed Loop. Need we say more?

Contact: Thomas P Troub(818) 576-3142 thomas.troub@medtronic.com to get involved.

There are so many studies out there that need our help. We help ourselves AND all people with diabetes. Do what you can. If you can’t participate, share this post with someone who might be able to volunteer.

Why Clinical Trials Matter To People With Diabetes

819412_43058630Clinical trials means better drugs and devices.

Better drugs and devices mean better treatments.

Better treatments mean longer, healthier lives.

Longer, healthier lives means more time with the people you love.

Clinical trials = love.

Clinicaltrials.gov is the first place to look to see if there is a clinical trial you can participate in that happens to be in your area.

Want a little nudge?

Click on this link for all open clinical trials in the United States with “diabetes” as the keyword.

Click on this link for all open clinical trials in the United States with “Type 1 diabetes” as the keyword. (There are currently 428 studies available.)

You can modify your search and pick your state (heck, if you are out of the U.S., there are still studies you can do). Some areas have more opportunities than others, but this is your chance to get involved and help all people with diabetes. I’ve done clinical trials and am always on the lookout to do more. Why?

Clinical trials = love.

Our very good friends have a child with cancer. This child was being treated with high-dose chemotherapy and developed a life-threatening liver issue. The only treatment that gave them an option was through a clinical trial. That clinical trial saved his life. In participating in the trial, his results will help pave the way for better treatment options for others. He didn’t have a choice (thankfully the clinical trial was available), but we have a choice right now to help others.

Clinicaltrials.gov is a crappy website. Yep. There. I said it. It’s not user-friendly, but it does provide you with all of the information you need. And you can look at it anytime because they’re constantly updating it. For ALL disease states, not just diabetes.

Want to Participate?

Once you’ve found a study that you might want to participate in, you’ll need to check the “inclusion criteria,” which will tell you whether you not you’re a candidate. Some are specifically by age range, some may exclude those who have had illnesses, and others must have individuals in a certain weight range or HbA1C range. If you meet the criteria, you can contact the study coordinator and get more information.

Some trials will provide not only the medication or device during the trial, but medical team appointments and travel/monetary compensation. You can be altruistic AND help yourself at the same time!

If you see your medical team at a research center, ask them if there are any clinical studies that you can participate in. (You never know!)

Also, if you happen to be in the Chicago area and meet the criteria, here’s something that you can do to help…

Research Study for Young Adults with Type 1 Diabetes at University of Illinois Chicago

If you are 18 to 30 years old with Type 1 Diabetes, using an insulin pump, not working Evening, Night or Rotating Shifts and willing to participate in a research study then you may be able to help!

Research activities will include: 1 hour visit for health history and physical, wearing monitors to measure activity & glucose and an overnight sleep study.

Research Related activities will occur at: UIC College of Nursing (845 South Damen StreetChicago, IL 60612) and UIC Sleep Science Center (2242 West Harrison Street, Suite 104, Chicago, IL 60612)

Participants will be compensated for time and travel.

If interested please contact the Principal Investigator, Sarah Farabi (email: sschwa24@uic.edu or phone: 312-413-0317)