You Deserve More Than Roses…

1526731_10153042281067328_1047114686242280778_nI hear her laughter and my heart swells with love.

I cannot imagine my life without my daughter.

I cannot imagine my life without the insulin that keeps me alive so that I can hear her laughter.

And yet… there are children in the world who do not have access to the insulin that will keep them alive.

No laughter.

No life.

No more. 

In parts of the world (some closer to the U.S. than you think), there is a problem getting insulin to children.

Lack of access to insulin remains the most common cause of death in a child with diabetes (Gale, 2006). The estimated life expectancy of a child who has just developed diabetes could be less than a year in some areas (Beran et al, 2005). Many die undiagnosed, others through lack of insulin or lack of expert care. In some countries, expert care is available but resources are limited and so early and serious complications frequently lead to death in young adulthood. – IDF

We know that insulin is expensive in the United States, but for some families in the world, the cost of insulin is more than a family will make in an entire year. And you know what can change that?

Us. 

roseFor the past few years, the Spare A Rose, Save A Child online campaign has helped to raise funds for the International Diabetes Federation (IDF)’s Life for a Child campaign.

Life for a Child began over a decade ago and gives donor funds directly to diabetes centers around the world, getting children insulin, test strip supplies, and care to help these children live… and laugh.

How Can You Help?

Valentine’s Day is coming.

Flowers are pretty. Chocolates are nice. Perfume smells lovely (Sometimes.)

But flowers wither. Chocolates get eaten. Perfume wafts away into the air.

You deserve more than that. 

Five dollars.

The cost of a single rose. Or a very expensive piece of chocolate. Or a few spritzes of perfume. (Or even that teddy bear that gets purchased at the gas station on the way home.) Five dollars gives a child with diabetes in an underdeveloped country a month of life.

Let those who love you know that you’ll take one less rose. One less piece of chocolate. Skip the spritz. You want them to give five dollars (or more) to the Spare A Rose, Save A Child campaign.

You can have them donate once or… they can remind you that you are loved throughout the year with a monthly gift to the program. You get a sweet acknowledgment and the knowledge that you are helping people all over the world hear a child laugh.

Want to get your office in on the action? Done. Easy-peasy-give-insulin-to-kids-squeezy.

Your donation is tax-deductible. (So, for those of you who are romantic AND financially savvy… you can say I love you and write it off. It’s still sexy.)

What About People YOU Love?

And of course, think about the people YOU love. You can donate in their name, then print out this card (or the other one) to let them know you love them more than roses.

You love them more than life itself. 

Click here to give life for a child. 

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#Giving Tuesday – More Than One Way To Give

The diabetes community has something in common besides malfunctioning pancreases*: our giving nature.

*I prefer pancrei, but Webster’s would probably laugh at the petition.

We do it all year round and in many ways: Spare A Rose, Save A Child; JDRF and ADA Walks, volunteering time and talent to projects like Nightscout (CGM in The Cloud) and Tidepool, sharing knowledge and much needed support through non-profits like Diabetes Hands Foundation and diaTribe (who is celebrating their First Anniversary as a non-profit!) and much more.

So, it seems strange to ask you to donate today, because you already do so much to help others in our community, but here I go, hat in hand (but a lovely chapeau it is, bedecked in feathers and a wide brim)…

Whether it is a few minutes or a few dollars, please consider helping these worthy causes today:

It costs you nothing, but the addition of your voice is priceless.

We have two days left to tell the FDA that patients should be involved in every discussion, at every level, when it comes to the devices we use to keep us healthy and safe. Go here, read the easy steps, and add your comments to the FDA docket. (It closes December 4th, so giddy up, cowboy.)

I’m truthfully astonished to see how far the diabetes community has come in the last year, rallying to ensure the FDA understands how important our opinions matter. They’ve been stellar at recognizing and working with us, but there are no resting on laurels, because while we know it and some forward-thinking individuals know it, not everyone does. Until there’s a cure, all we have is our voice. Give it today.

You’re Going To Shop, So Might As Well Give At The Same Time

Full disclosure: When I’m not being a rabble rouser or loving on my family, I’m the founder of The Diabetes Collective, Inc., which is a recognized 501(c)(3) non-profit organization, created to fund programs like The Diabetes UnConference. There are so many wonderful non-profits out there that focus on living well with diabetes, so why create one more? Because there wasn’t a program designed to bring all adults with diabetes together to share their thoughts and get support in a safe environment. In order to make that happen (and some other things that will be coming after the first Diabetes UnConference is in the bag), The Diabetes Collective, Inc. was founded.

The Diabetes Collective, Inc.

Amazon has a program called AmazonSmile and you can select The Diabetes Collective as your charitable organization.

“The AmazonSmile Foundation will donate 0.5% of the purchase price from your eligible AmazonSmile purchases. The purchase price is the amount paid for the item minus any rebates and excluding shipping & handling, gift-wrapping fees, taxes, or service charges. From time to time, we may offer special, limited time promotions that increase the donation amount on one or more products or services or provide for additional donations to charitable organizations.”

There is NO additional cost to you. The prices on Amazon are the same as if you are shopping without the AmazonSmile selection.

Please consider helping this way by choosing The Diabetes Collective, Inc. as your non-profit organization and help support the scholarships we provide to bring people with diabetes together to have the discussions they can’t have with their doctors or family.

If You Got a Penny or Two to Share…

You can donate directly to The Diabetes Collective, Inc. by clicking on the button below or on this link.  It will take you directly to a secure PayPal checkout.

un-diabetes-conference-fullcolor-h

This is a tax-deductible donation so you’ll get a tax receipt from The Diabetes Collective, Inc. for 2014. Any amount will help.


But I also want to direct you to another amazing opportunity that is near and dear to my heart: The Bionic Pancreas.

You can donate (and it’s tax -deductible) here:

GoBio_Fundraiser_thumbnail_260x202

There you have it. Three ways to give: no money, giving through shopping, and giving through tax donation. Do one, two, or all three.

Wait. Stop. There’s one more way to give.

You can share this post with your friends. Your family. Strangers on the street. Tell them about how important a role diabetes plays in your life (even though you don’t want it to…) and how they can help you and millions of other people. (And if you don’t follow this blog on Twitter or Facebook, please do! I’m funny on all sorts of social media avenues!)

So, give. Whether it’s your time, your shopping acumen, or with a financial gift. I adore you for even allowing me to put it out there.

Give what you can.

Do what you can.

And we are grateful.

Monday Morning Musings…

1427584_81613555I took a little blogging break last week. It wasn’t intentional; I had other things cooking on the burners and gave them the time that was due to them. In the end, it all goes in the same pot, but it was strange to not write. (And that’s the extent of my chef metaphors.)

And now I sit with a large amount of caffeine, thinking about the good things that are happening in the diabetes world. In no particular order…

The Power of Community

According to an unofficial total (but from a source I trust), the Spare a Rose, Save a Child campaign raised…drumroll, please… $26,519. That’s a lot of insulin. That’s a lot of love. That’s a lot of lives that will be saved because the Diabetes Online Community raised their voices as one. I am in awe of the power of this community. For those who shared the message, thank you. For those who donated, thank you. (And it’s not too late to give a rose… )

StripSafely

Just because we’re not shaking the gates in person doesn’t mean that we aren’t working on ensuring blood glucose meter accuracy isn’t on our minds. Larry Ellingson has a guest blog post over at StripSafely.com, asking us all to join him in calling for congressional oversight of meter accuracy. I had the pleasure of meeting Larry at the DTS meeting in September, and I’m glad he believes as we do: whatever it takes to make sure we stay healthy and safe.

Think meter accuracy is not important? Larry gives another statistic that scares me (and it should scare you, too!):

 A second survey confirmed that 27 percent of patients with type 1 diabetes had experienced health problems due to inaccurate blood glucose meter readings.

The FDA can only do so much at this point. It’s up to us to rally together to bring Congress the news: we need their help. Bennet and I will be putting together some points that you can use when talking with your representatives soon.

It’s an i-port Advance

Medtronic announced the i-port Advance, an “all-in-one” injection port. For those who take multiple daily injections, it basically takes the place of injecting into different places… and into the injection port. You insert the i-port Advance and for the next 72 hours, you inject into the port.

Injection ports aren’t new. I remember using an injection port years ago. (I don’t remember why. It was probably a sample or two to see if I liked it, but obviously I didn’t care for it, because I didn’t use it for long.) If you have needle phobia, it’s a great way to ease the fear of having to inject more than once a day. If you micro dose fast acting insulin for optimum control, this may be a great way to avoid seven or eight injections each day.

There was a study done in 2008 about the impact of insulin injections on daily life and the results didn’t surprise me much. The study showed that out of 500 subjects, 29% of them stated that injecting insulin was the hardest part of their diabetes care. Fourteen percent of the subjects said that insulin injections have a negative impact on their life. So… obviously there’s a need to help alleviates some of the negativity. The i-port Advance is one way to do so.

The Future of Glucagon

For anyone carrying around that red hard case in the bottom of a bag or a purse or next to your bed, you will nod your head when I say this: Glucagon is a pain in the ass. (Sometimes literally.)

The Glucagon Emergency Kit has been around for quite a while, but unless you’re with someone who knows how to use it, it’s useless. If you pass out, the last thing a stranger will do is rifle through your bag looking for something to help you. Even if you’ve shown a friend or a work colleague how to use it, when push comes to shove (or push comes to drop on the floor), it may be too complicated.

True story: I would give a little primer about my glucagon emergency kit to my staff. New team member = pull it out and go through the motions. I would end every discussion about glucagon with this: “Call 911 first. Then attempt to inject me.” Then the discussion would be who would draw the short straw to do this. I trusted my team, but knew that glucagon was a last resort.

These days, I’m hopeful that glucagon will be available in an easier delivery mechanism – and perhaps even not by injection! Mike Hoskins over at DiabetesMine has a great article about Next-Gen Emergency Glucagon, in which he discusses the big issue: stability of glucagon. (Currently, once mixed, it’s good for 24 hours. After that, pfftt.) But even more exciting? This:

Assessment of Intranasal Glucagon in Children and Adolescents With Type 1 Diabetes – Yes. It’s a clinical trial that currently is recruiting kids for an intranasal dose… Could this be more awesome? Nope. I am hoping that this is what’s in store for all of us. I’d be much happier giving a primer about: Hold this up to my nose and squirt. Wouldn’t you?

By the way, there’s also a trial for adults: Effectiveness and Safety of Intranasal Glucagon for Treatment of Hypoglycemia in Adults. You can get a little more info here: Evaluate the Immunogenicity of a Novel Glucagon Formulation. The company behind this is AMG Medical, Inc. out of Canada. I’m eager to see the outcome of these trials!

So, as I sit here this morning, I’m buzzing with excitement (or is it caffeine) with hope for the future. What are you excited about?

 

How Do I Love Thee? Let Me Count The…Insulin Units.

roseI don’t believe that professions of love should be relegated to just one day.  I also don’t believe that children (or anyone) should die from Type 1 diabetes.

Do you agree? (At least about the diabetes issue.)

The DOC (Diabetes Online Community) agrees and we want to raise awareness (and donations), so that the International Diabetes Foundation’s program, Life of a Child, can give children with diabetes the true profession of love: life through insulin.

Life of a Child began over a decade ago and gives donor funds directly to diabetes centers around the world, allowing those centers to help children with clinical care. Over 12,000 children in 43 countries are given the gift of life through this essential program. But that’s not enough.

Lack of access to insulin remains the most common cause of death in a child with diabetes (Gale, 2006). The estimated life expectancy of a child who has just developed diabetes could be less than a year in some areas (Beran et al, 2005). Many die undiagnosed, others through lack of insulin or lack of expert care. In some countries, expert care is available but resources are limited and so early and serious complications frequently lead to death in young adulthood. – IDF

From as far away as the Solomon Islands to as close as Haiti and the Dominican Republic, children with diabetes need help. It’s atrocious to think that some children lose their lives because diabetes care is more than an entire family makes in a year.

Please consider donating the cost of a single rose ($5) to the Spare A Rose, Save A Child community effort. (Or more…) Your sweetheart still receives flowers and the knowledge that you both helped to save a life.

Spare A Rose, Save A Child
Click on this link, which will take you to the donation page of Spare A Rose, Save A Child.

Now, I know you’re asking… “So, I donated the money I would have spent on a rose (or a dozen roses, because you are totally amazing), but now what do I give my beloved?”

You give them a spiffy certificate – and you have your choice of two!

Card 1Card 2

A dozen roses doesn’t prove I love you… or Roses Are Red, My Face Just Smiled…

Both are adorable.

The goal this year is to raise $10,000. That’s a lot of roses. That’s a lot of love. That’s a lot of life.

Show your love to those you love and donate.

(And P.S.? Even if you can’t donate, would you share this with your friends on social media or email? It’s hard to love you more than I already do, but I can try, right? Thank you.)