Category: Good Stuff To Know

The Diabetes UnConference DEADLINES

Hi, you.

Yes, you. I’m talking to you with the diabetes.*

Wanted to give you a quick update on what’s going on with The Diabetes UnConference. (And if you don’t know what it is… please go to www.DiabetesUnConference.com and learn about the first multi-day peer-to-peer idea exchange for ALL adults with diabetes (Type 1, Type 2, Type I want to talk about my diabetes…) being held at the Flamingo Las Vegas from March 13 - 15, 2015.

Room Block Deadline: February 12, 2020

1145DB10980204DD1A48CB84162B3570Book your room now.

The super-duper low room rate at The Flamingo Las Vegas, where the conference is being held, is only available until February 12, 2020. (This means you can count the days left on two hands if you have all ten fingers. If you don’t, well… borrow.)

After that, they release the room block to the hoards of basketball fans who will descend on Las Vegas for March Madness. (We root for Team Diabetes UnConference. We are undefeated.)

Don’t get caught paying a stupidly high rate for a room that you can get for a song (if that song costs $69.00+applicable tax and fees) through The Diabetes UnConference room block. Check out the information about The Flamingo Las Vegas here. And book your room here.

Attendee Registration Deadline: March 1, 2020

un-diabetes-conference-fullcolor-iconEven if you aren’t planning on staying at the hotel, please register by March 1st. We won’t be able to accommodate walk-ups, as head counts must be given to catering and for the incredible Dexcom sponsored High Roller event. I would hate for anyone to not be able to participate because they waited until the last minute. I can’t “squeeze you in”. Don’t miss out.

Why Should You Come To The Diabetes UnConference?

You can learn why I think you should come. Watch this interview where I make a lot of funny faces and answer questions (thank to TuDiabetes for the hilarious chat!):

Of course, you don’t have to take my word for it. Take their words:

  • DiabetesMine’s words 
  • A Sweet Life’s words 
  • Kerri Sparling of Six Until Me’s words
  • Stephen of Happy-Medium’s words
  • Rhonda of Fifteen Wait Fifteen’s words
  • Diabetes Daily’s words
  • Heather of Unexpected Blues’ words
  • Kelly of Diabetesaliciousness’ Words

We want you to be there. We want you to feel like you can talk openly about diabetes without judgment and learn from others. We want you to join us for the crazy, zany, beautiful things that will happen.

Don’t miss out. We don’t want to miss you. 

*And you with the desire to help those with diabetes. We love you, too. While you can’t join us this year, you can help spread the word. Don’t worry… we have plans for you to come next year!

un-diabetes-conference-fullcolor-h

I Don’t Expect You To Know…

1436093_55811447My car runs on unleaded gas. It goes from point A to point B (and sometimes to point H when I don’t follow the GPS correctly) and it has an engine. I understand the basics of internal combustion and in my more adventurous youth, I even changed my spark plugs and oil on my own. (I think every woman every person should know how to do that.)

I drive it with the knowledge that I don’t know everything about how a car works. I watch Top Gear (the U.K. version, of course), but that does not make me a gear head. There’s a lot I don’t understand about cars.

I’m not expected to know; that’s why expert mechanics exist. If it makes a funny noise or squeals as I brake, I take it to someone who can diagnose the issue and hopefully fix it without putting me into hock. Even people who change my car’s oil may not understand how the engine works or what that funny noise is.

Replace car with diabetes and other appropriate phrases related to a disease. (Heck, if you want to go for broke, you can replace car with any major illness.)

Now re-read those first two paragraphs.

I Don’t Expect You To Know…

I don’t expect you to know how diabetes works (or doesn’t work). There’s a lot of moving parts to the intricate dance we do each day to get from Point A to Point B (and we sometimes end up at Point H without any idea of how we got there). I don’t expect you to know how I feel when my blood sugar is crashing to the floor or soaring towards the ceiling; my symptoms and side effects are unique (although many share the same symptoms and side effects). I don’t expect anyone to know what the diagnosis signs are or how they can help me, and millions of other people, live well.

All of this to say: Let’s stop berating others if they don’t know about diabetes, especially those in the medical field. Sounds crazy, right?

“What do you mean the ER nurse didn’t know what a CGM is?”

“The optometrist asked you what your blood sugar was this morning?”

“The doctor wanted to take your insulin pump off in the hospital?”

“The LPN told you that she has diabetes, too, when she saw your medical alert bracelet, but that hers wasn’t severe?”

“The nurse said that they’d give you insulin just when you eat, but no basal insulin at all?”

We are the experts…

We are the experts. We live with this disease 24/7/365 ad infinitum. Most of the medical world hasn’t had more than a mention of diabetes in a class for their certification or degree (with the exception being CDEs and endocrinologists). Are you amazed at that?

This is the curriculum for a BS degree in Nursing at NYU. There isn’t a single “Diabetes” class in their four year program, either as requirements or electives. Would it shock you to learn that, according to a Diabetes Care journal article in 1990, 20% of nursing faculty surveyed said that their students had 0 to 8 hours of clinical experience with diabetes patients during their education? (And most of those patients were over the age of 65?)

269548_4087We have a choice…

When we encounter someone (in the medical field or in public) who doesn’t understand what diabetes is or has a misperception of what we do every day, we have a choice. We can express incredulity at their lack of knowledge and become defensive about our disease, or… we can educate them. 

“The ER nurse didn’t know what a CGM is?”

Nope, because when she went to school, CGMs didn’t exist. And really, the majority of people with Type 1 diabetes don’t use (or don’t have access to use) a continuous glucose monitor. So, those who do use them are a subset of a subset of a large group of people with diabetes. A simple explanation of what a CGM does and how it helps you prevent hypoglycemic or hyperglycemic episodes can go a long way to not only educate that ER nurse, but perhaps create an ally or future advocate in the ER for diabetes.

“The optometrist asked you what your blood sugar was this morning?”

Yep, because even if you put that you’re Type 1 on your intake form, they don’t know how often you check. You can simply smile, explain that while you checked this morning, you’ve also checked twice (or six times!) since then. You can talk about the difference between Type 1 and Type 2 and that all people with diabetes can get the same eye complications. (Retinopathy and macular edema doesn’t discriminate between types.)

“The doctor wanted to take off your insulin pump in the hospital?”

If you’re wearing an insulin pump, you may know more about diabetes than that doctor. You can begin a dialog as to why the insulin pump needs to be removed. They may not understand the technology - and it’s up to you to explain that your pump supplies a basal rate and boluses when needed. However, if you’re in the hospital because of DKA or a severe hypoglycemic episode, the pump may be the issue. Have the conversation - a two-way conversation - and ask that your endocrinologist or a hospital endocrinologist be brought in to consult.

(Side note: That all being said, if you encounter an endo or a CDE who doesn’t understand the basic mechanics of diabetes, please run, do not walk, out of that office.)

When people say things that make you angry because it’s clear that they don’t understand diabetes, take a breath and remind yourself that you didn’t know much (if at all) about this disease before you were diagnosed. It’s frustrating when you encounter someone in the medical field who may not understand, especially because they are dealing with you. They just haven’t been taught. Yet.

Teach…

We can’t expect anyone to know, but we can expect everyone to learn. And if we want everyone to learn, then it’s up to us to be knowledgeable about diabetes and the devices that we use. We should be able to explain in simple terms and invite questions. We should be able to ask our own questions and be our own advocate. We should be able to smile and talk about the differences between types of diabetes and explain that there are more that the types have in common than separate them.

We won’t change the world overnight, but imagine if you could calmly explain the disease to someone and walk away knowing that they’re a little more knowledgeable about diabetes? Or give them websites so that they can learn more?

Sounds crazy, right?

Let’s be crazy.

 

 

 

Why Clinical Trials Matter To People With Diabetes

819412_43058630Clinical trials means better drugs and devices.

Better drugs and devices mean better treatments.

Better treatments mean longer, healthier lives.

Longer, healthier lives means more time with the people you love.

Clinical trials = love.

Clinicaltrials.gov is the first place to look to see if there is a clinical trial you can participate in that happens to be in your area.

Want a little nudge?

Click on this link for all open clinical trials in the United States with “diabetes” as the keyword.

Click on this link for all open clinical trials in the United States with “Type 1 diabetes” as the keyword. (There are currently 428 studies available.)

You can modify your search and pick your state (heck, if you are out of the U.S., there are still studies you can do). Some areas have more opportunities than others, but this is your chance to get involved and help all people with diabetes. I’ve done clinical trials and am always on the lookout to do more. Why?

Clinical trials = love.

Our very good friends have a child with cancer. This child was being treated with high-dose chemotherapy and developed a life-threatening liver issue. The only treatment that gave them an option was through a clinical trial. That clinical trial saved his life. In participating in the trial, his results will help pave the way for better treatment options for others. He didn’t have a choice (thankfully the clinical trial was available), but we have a choice right now to help others.

Clinicaltrials.gov is a crappy website. Yep. There. I said it. It’s not user-friendly, but it does provide you with all of the information you need. And you can look at it anytime because they’re constantly updating it. For ALL disease states, not just diabetes.

Want to Participate?

Once you’ve found a study that you might want to participate in, you’ll need to check the “inclusion criteria,” which will tell you whether you not you’re a candidate. Some are specifically by age range, some may exclude those who have had illnesses, and others must have individuals in a certain weight range or HbA1C range. If you meet the criteria, you can contact the study coordinator and get more information.

Some trials will provide not only the medication or device during the trial, but medical team appointments and travel/monetary compensation. You can be altruistic AND help yourself at the same time!

If you see your medical team at a research center, ask them if there are any clinical studies that you can participate in. (You never know!)

Also, if you happen to be in the Chicago area and meet the criteria, here’s something that you can do to help…

Research Study for Young Adults with Type 1 Diabetes at University of Illinois Chicago

If you are 18 to 30 years old with Type 1 Diabetes, using an insulin pump, not working Evening, Night or Rotating Shifts and willing to participate in a research study then you may be able to help!

Research activities will include: 1 hour visit for health history and physical, wearing monitors to measure activity & glucose and an overnight sleep study.

Research Related activities will occur at: UIC College of Nursing (845 South Damen StreetChicago, IL 60612) and UIC Sleep Science Center (2242 West Harrison Street, Suite 104, Chicago, IL 60612)

Participants will be compensated for time and travel.

If interested please contact the Principal Investigator, Sarah Farabi (email: sschwa24@uic.edu or phone: 312-413-0317)

 

 

Diabetes & Taxes

90376_1582Death, taxes… diabetes. We’re all certain that until there is a cure, we’ve definitely got diabetes and have to pay our taxes (at least in the United States). Don’t we already bleed enough?

When you have a very expensive chronic illness (hint: diabetes is a very expensive chronic illness), it pays to be prepared when it comes to doing your taxes and squeezing every dime out of your medical deduction. You need to begin the hunt for your expenses - and the receipts for those expenses.

Topic 502 of the IRS is all about Medical and Dental Expenses. We all need to know about this topic. Here’s the deal if you itemize your expenses on your 1040:

For years beginning after December 31, 2012, you may deduct only the amount of your total medical expenses that exceed 10% of your adjusted gross income or 7.5% if you or your spouse is 65 or older. The 7.5% limitation is a temporary exemption starting January 1, 2021 to December 31, 2020 for individuals age 65 and older and their spouses.

It Pays To Itemize

It pays to itemize. Seriously. Plain and simple: we spend a lot of our diabetes care, but we don’t think about all of the items. (And a lot of the time, we don’t keep the receipts…)

I’m telling you this: start now. Even if you didn’t keep the receipts from last year, start collecting. If you’re high tech, scan them in somewhere. Take a picture of your receipts and put them in a file on your computer. Heck, get a folder and put it next to your keys and put any receipts that can be included as medical/dental expenses into it. Find a system that works for you. But start now.

Ground Rules

I AM NOT A TAX PROFESSIONAL. Oh, please. I have a BA degree and a MSc. degree, neither of which is in accounting. You know (hopefully) by now how much I do not like math. I use a bolus calculator for a reason. I have wonderful friends who are CPAs. Do not look to me for tax advice. Do not look to me as the shining pillar of how to do taxes. I am many things, but I am not a tax professional nor am I perfect. (I am The Perfect D, but…)

I’m not giving you the entire list of what are considered acceptable deductible medical expenses. If you want the whole list, you can get it from the IRS website.

Here are the ground rules for what you can deduct:

  • You can only include the medical expenses you paid during the year and you can only use the expenses once on the return.
  • If you got reimbursed for any medical expenses, you must reduce the expense by the amount you were reimbursed.

For instance: You paid a doctor $120 for an appointment in May of 2014, sent the receipt into your insurance, and they sent you a check for $100 in December of 2014. You can then only claim $20 for this 2014 expense on your taxes, because you paid only $20 to see the doctor. 

What You Can Deduct If You Have Diabetes

Deductible diabetes medical expenses may include (but are not limited) to:

Your payments to your healthcare team: physicians, CDEs, nutritionists, dietitians, psychiatrists, psychologists, endocrinologists, nephrologists, podiatrists, cardiologists, physical therapists, chiropractors, and “non-traditional medical practitioners”, including acupuncture for smoking cessation, and massage therapists when used for a medical condition.

Your prescriptions/insulin. Anything that you have a prescription for, you can list as a medical expense. And… even if you don’t have a prescription for insulin, it’s still a medical expense that is covered. That includes your pump and all supplies. Your insulin pens and syringes and cartridges. If it helps you get the drug into your body, it’s a medical expense that can be deducted.

Your meter and blood glucose testing supplies. (These are diagnostic devices and therefore, covered. Same goes for your CGM and sensors. Ketone test strips (urine or blood).

291573_5192Your medical supplies. Yeah, you’re thinking, of course. But medical supplies include: alcohol swabs, IV Prep 3000, Band-Aids, etc.

Your eyeglasses or contact lenses. If you have contact lenses, you can deduct the cost of the enzyme cleaners and daily cleaning solutions. Don’t forget to include your eye exam, even if it was a refraction/non-dilated exam. That’s included.

Dental treatments at the dentist’s office, including cleanings and fillings. (You cannot expense floss, toothbrushes, or toothpaste.)

Your guide dog expenses, including grooming and food and vet fees. 

Your lab fees. Your ambulance fees or ER fees or hospital stay. All of it is covered. They’ll send you receipts. You’ll weep at seeing how much they charge.

Your lodging for medical care (up to $50 per person per night) (meals not included), if:

  1. The lodging is primarily for and essential to medical care.
  2. The medical care is provided by a doctor in a licensed hospital or in a medical care facility related to, or the equivalent of, a licensed hospital.
  3. The lodging is not lavish or extravagant under the circumstances.
  4. There is no significant element of personal pleasure, recreation, or vacation in the travel away from home.

Your cost of special dietary considerations (i.e. celiac disease - and you must click on that link and read this post from one of my favorite bloggers) or costs for participation in a weight-loss program after an obesity diagnosis) when prescribed by a doctor. Don’t try to deduct health club dues. Nope.

Your admission/registration costs AND travel expenses for a chronically ill person or spouse or a parent of a chronically ill kid to attend a medical conference to learn about new medical treatments. (You can’t deduct meals or lodging while attending the conference.) Hello? Friends for Life? AADE or ADA? Ahem. Deductible medical expenses. Holla. 

Your Electronic Health Records cost to keep all your data in one place. Also known as a “medical information plan” or a “personal electronic health record.”

1442111_98999959Your transportation costs to and from medical appointments/hospitals/medical centers. Don’t forget tolls, parking, gas, oil… Straight from the IRS:

Payments for transportation primarily for and essential to medical care that qualify as medical expenses, such as payments of the actual fare for a taxi, bus, train, ambulance, or for medical transportation by personal car, the amount of your actual out-of-pocket expenses such as for gas and oil, or the amount of the standard mileage rate for medical expenses, plus the cost of tolls and parking fees.

Some of your health insurance premiums. I’m not going to get into this one, as it’s a minefield of what you can and cannot deduct. You need to look at the IRS website on this particular subset.

What You Can’t Deduct

One of the things that I wish could be covered is hypoglycemia recovery supplies (i.e. glucose tabs, juice, etc.). I’m doing everything that I can to keep that cost to a minimum, but really… we all probably spend far too much on that, and it’s not reimbursable. (Not unless you have a prescription written by your doctor for “juice”…)

You can’t deduct the cost of the cell phone plans and minutes calling your insurance company to argue over what is covered and what isn’t.

You can’t medically deduct the cost of your Internet service plan for the time you spend getting peer to peer support online from the DOC.

You can’t deduct the over-the-counter salves and moisturizers to keep our pretty diabetic feet from cracking or drying out.

Hopefully I’ve triggered something in your brain that says: “I can deduct that?! Booya!” Start preparing now for the 2014 tax season. (I’m quite aware that U.S. taxes are not due until April 15th, but don’t wait until the 15th to think about all the items that you can add together for your medical expense deductions… you’ll get overwhelmed and you’ll inevitably miss something.)

Happy deduction hunting! 

 

 

 

Your 2015 Diabetes Conference Calendar!

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After not being able to find a single source for diabetes events and conferences that might be of interest for those who have diabetes and/or advocate for diabetes, I decided to create one in 2014 - and we’re continuing with a 2015 calendar for all diabetes conferences and events that you might be interested in attending.

Ta-da.

Please note that this is U.S.-centric, as I currently live in the United States. (Most of me. My pancreas is currently on the lam somewhere where it cannot be extradited.) However, I have added some international conferences. Most of these can be attended by the hoi polloi, but some do require a medical designation/degree (although a press pass may provide entry). These are regional or national shindigs, not local groups or walks. 

If there is one that I have missed, please notify me at theperfectd [at] gmail [dot] com so I can add it. I will be updating this calendar throughout the year so I suggest you bookmark this page now. (Go ahead. I’ll wait.) 

Click on the title of the conference/event for the website link/additional information.

January

Winter Slipstream 2015 (Connected in Motion) January 16 - 18, 2015 -  Camp Kandalore, Algonquin Highlands,  Ontario, Canada 

If you’re sporty and love The Great White North (to which the latter I can wholeheartedly attest), then go hang out with other Type 1s and do some cold weather athletic stuff. Connected In Motion is an amazing organization that will hopefully continue to do a lot of amazing work now that the U.S. based diabetes athletes organization, InsulinDependence, has closed its doors.

51st Annual Clinical Diabetes and Endocrinology Conference (National Jewish Health) January 23 - 27, 2015 - Snowmass, CO

February

ADA Research Summit Maryland 2015 February 7, 2021 - Towson, MD

The American Diabetes Association, Maryland Chapter is pleased to present a day of learning and interacting with world renowned scientists and clinicians focused on finding cures and better treatments for diabetes. This is free and open to the public, but only the first 220 registered can attend.

TYOCD (Taking Control of Your Diabetes) February 7, 2015 - Augusta, GA

TCOYD is a one-day program with tracks for both Type 1 and Type 2 individuals (and their friends and family, of course). Those who attend will have opportunities to learn about the latest tools, tips, techniques, and technology to help live healthier lives with diabetes. What I love about this program is that it was founded and is run by physicians who have intimate knowledge of diabetes; they have the disease! Many of the speakers also have Type 1 or Type 2 diabetes, so it’s not as if it’s a “do as I say and not as I do, because I don’t have a clue” program. If you have one coming to your area, you’re fortunate!

American Diabetes Association (ADA) Expo February 7, 2021 - Denver, CO

The American Diabetes Association Expo is a one-day exposition where one can peruse through exhibits and talk with professionals and those who are looking to promote items that may help people with diabetes manage the disease. There are health screens and demonstrations and is open and free for everyone. (If you know of anyone who may be at risk, bring them to one of these.)

EASD Diabetes Technology Meeting 2015 February 11-12, 2015 - Düsseldorf, Germany

This meeting, held not in the United States, will present “top level research” in all areas of diabetes technology. They claim that they will also present a joint statement from the ADA and EASD on insulin pumps.

8th Annual American Diabetes Association Montana Family Retreat February 20 - 22, 2015 Fairmont, MT 

Family Retreat is an event designed for all people living with type 1 diabetes. Education and activities are built specifically for families with children or teenagers with type 1 diabetes. There will be separate breakout sessions for parents, teenagers, and children.

Registration fees include all meals, activities, and hotel room for Friday evening through Sunday morning.  Families or groups of 6 or more will be charged additional fees for a second room. ($180 Adults, 18 and over, $60 Children, 4-17 years old, Children 3 years and younger are free - financial assistance is available.)

62nd Annual Advanced Postgraduate Course (ADA) February 27 - March 1, 2020 -  New York City, NY

A medical conference much like other scientific sessions, leading diabetes experts will give presentations on the latest in diabetes research and care, with small networking sessions thrown in for good measure. Targeted primarily for physicians, physician assistants, nurses, nurse practitioners, dietitians, pharmacists, psychologists, certified diabetes educators, and other health care professionals who care for patients with diabetes and who manage the complications related to this disease.

March

15TH Annual Rachmiel Levine Diabetes & Obesity Symposium March 1 - 4, 2015 - San Diego, CA

Made possible by the Beckman Research Institute of City of Hope, held in association with the Endocrine Society annual meeting and T1D Exchange. This is the meeting that I wish I could attend, because it covers some amazing topics: new biomarkers and drug targets, epigenetics (A debate on virus or “not a virus”) talks about the DCCT, inflammation, live debates, beta-cell function, islet cell reprogramming, and much more. (If anyone is going, please get in contact with me at theperfectd [at] gmail.com because I want to pick your brain!)

2015 Type One Nation Research Summit March 7, 2020 - Bethesda, MD

“We are thrilled to provide this unique opportunity for education and dialogue with leading experts and researchers in the type 1 diabetes (T1D) field on Saturday, March 7, 2020 at no cost to the attendees. In addition to the main program, we offer an exhibit hall full of all the latest and greatest in T1D education, resources and technology, as well as a Youth Program and Teen Track with age-appropriate guest speakers and activities. In 2014, the TypeOneNation Research Summit attracted over 800 individuals from the Mid-Atlantic region and we are looking forward to another great year!New this year — “Taking T1D to School” session.Admission is FREE with suggested donation. Buffet lunch is provided. Registration is REQUIRED and opens here on January 7th.”

ENDO 2015 (Endocrine Society) March 5 - 8, 2015 - San Diego, CA

Remember that endocrinology is not just about diabetes; it’s about the entire endocrine system. While the annual conference does have diabetes sessions, it’s not the primary focus.

TYOCD (Taking Control of Your Diabetes) March 7, 2020 - Santa Clara, CA 

TCOYD is a one-day program with tracks for both Type 1 and Type 2 individuals (and their friends and family, of course). Those who attend will have opportunities to learn about the latest tools, tips, techniques, and technology to help live healthier lives with diabetes. What I love about this program is that it was founded and is run by physicians who have intimate knowledge of diabetes; they have the disease! Many of the speakers also have Type 1 or Type 2 diabetes, so it’s not as if it’s a “do as I say and not as I do, because I don’t have a clue” program. If you have one coming to your area, you’re fortunate!

The Diabetes UnConference March 13 - 15, 2015 - Las Vegas, NV

The first peer-to-peer idea exchange and support conference for all adults with Type 1 and Type 2 diabetes. Unlike other conferences geared to patients, this conference has no keynotes or research/expert presentations; just discussions facilitated by those with diabetes about topics that may be difficult to have with people who don’t have diabetes!

American Diabetes Association (ADA) Expo March 14, 2015 - New York, NY 

The American Diabetes Association Expo is a one-day exposition where one can peruse through exhibits and talk with professionals and those who are looking to promote items that may help people with diabetes manage the disease. There are health screens and demonstrations and is open and free for everyone. (If you know of anyone who may be at risk, bring them to one of these.)

Bay Area Diabetes Summit March 14th, 2015 - Palo Alto, CA

The Bay Area Diabetes Summit is a collaborative effort of medical providers, community organizations, and medical institutions throughout the Bay Area. Dr. Bruce Buckingham of Stanford University and Dr. Ed Damiano of Boston University, developer of the Bionic Pancreas, will be the keynote speakers at the Summit.

The Summit is open to all adults with T1D and their spouses, friends, and significant others, parents, caregivers, and family members of children with T1D. Children with T1D and their siblings can register for a Kids Camp offered by DYF counselors and staff.

Type One Nation Summit (Southwest Ohio) March 15, 2020 - Cincinnati, OH

Featuring several breakout sessions and two nationally-known keynote speakers, this event is expected to attract 500-700 attendees.

TYOCD (Taking Control of Your Diabetes) March 28, 2020 - Austin, TX

TCOYD is a one-day program with tracks for both Type 1 and Type 2 individuals (and their friends and family, of course). Those who attend will have opportunities to learn about the latest tools, tips, techniques, and technology to help live healthier lives with diabetes. What I love about this program is that it was founded and is run by physicians who have intimate knowledge of diabetes; they have the disease! Many of the speakers also have Type 1 or Type 2 diabetes, so it’s not as if it’s a “do as I say and not as I do, because I don’t have a clue” program. If you have one coming to your area, you’re fortunate! (They’re missing the entire southeastern portion of the United States.)

April

American Diabetes Association (ADA) Expo April 18, 2015 - Chicago, IL

The American Diabetes Association Expo is a one-day exposition where one can peruse through exhibits and talk with professionals and those who are looking to promote items that may help people with diabetes manage the disease. There are health screens and demonstrations and is open and free for everyone. (If you know of anyone who may be at risk, bring them to one of these.)

Diabetes Sisters Annual Conference  April 24 - 26, 2015 Raleigh, NC

If you are looking for a conference that focuses on being a woman with diabetes, then look no further. Both Type 1 and Type 2s are welcomed with open arms and significant others are offered opportunities to talk (privately and separately) while you attend the conference. This is an opportunity to learn from other women and bask in the camaraderie of friends made (who just happen to also have diabetes).

TYOCD (Taking Control of Your Diabetes) April 25, 2015 - Honolulu, HI

TCOYD is a one-day program with tracks for both Type 1 and Type 2 individuals (and their friends and family, of course). Those who attend will have opportunities to learn about the latest tools, tips, techniques, and technology to help live healthier lives with diabetes. What I love about this program is that it was founded and is run by physicians who have intimate knowledge of diabetes; they have the disease! Many of the speakers also have Type 1 or Type 2 diabetes, so it’s not as if it’s a “do as I say and not as I do, because I don’t have a clue” program. If you have one coming to your area, you’re fortunate! (They’re missing the entire southeastern portion of the United States.)

GTC Diabetes Summit 2015 April 27-29, 2015 - Boston, MA

Got $2095? Then this conference is for you.

According to the website, that $2095 will get you research, partnership opportunities and network with academia, venture capital, government, small/medium size biotech, big pharma and healthcare organizations. The summit includes the Diabetes Drug Discovery and Development Conference, dealing with the clinical side of things. The Diabetes Partnering & Deal-Making Conference dives into opportunities for partnerships, funding, licensing, and the financial bits of it all.

(Now, that all being said… If you look at the speakers, I wish I had the $2095 to attend. Some of them are the top researchers in the diabetes community.)

May

Carb DM’s 3nd Annual Mother-Daughter Weekend May 1-3, 2015 - Dublin, CA

This amazing event is for preteen/teen girls with T1D and their moms. This weekend focuses on T1D from a female perspective and addresses the female cycle from puberty to pregnancy and how it affects and is affected by T1D. Mother daughter communication, healthy body image, talking with peers and significant others about T1D, and more will be discussed.

AACE 24th Annual Scientific and Clinical Congress (American Association of Clinical Endocrinologists) May 13 -17, 2015 Nashville, TN

TYOCD (Taking Control of Your Diabetes) May 16, 2015-  Kansas City, KS

TCOYD is a one-day program with tracks for both Type 1 and Type 2 individuals (and their friends and family, of course). Those who attend will have opportunities to learn about the latest tools, tips, techniques, and technology to help live healthier lives with diabetes. What I love about this program is that it was founded and is run by physicians who have intimate knowledge of diabetes; they have the disease! Many of the speakers also have Type 1 or Type 2 diabetes, so it’s not as if it’s a “do as I say and not as I do, because I don’t have a clue” program. If you have one coming to your area, you’re fortunate! (They’re missing the entire southeastern portion of the United States.)

30th Annual Clinical Conference on Diabetes (ADA) May 21 - 24, 2015,  Orlando, FL

While not patient-centric, attendees will hear “cutting-edge research translated into clinical practice”. The 30th Annual Clinical Conference is designed specifically for primary care and diabetes specialty physicians, doctor of osteopathy, podiatrists, pharmacists, physician assistants, nurse practitioners, nurses, psychologists and dietitians, certified diabetes educators and other health care professionals who care for patients with diabetes, at risk for diabetes, and who manage diabetes related complications.

Students With Diabetes National Conference May 22 - 24, 2015 - Tampa, FL

A conference for young adults aged 18 - 30 from all over the country who want to learn about the latest in technology, research, and more from many amazing speakers.

June

 75th Scientific Sessions (ADA) June 5-9, 2015 - Boston, MA

The “big” medical conference. While not specifically designed for the layperson with diabetes, many advocates do attend and sit in on sessions. Many study results are presented. Last year’s presentations weren’t mind-blowing, but we have a feeling that some big study results are on the horizon.

July

MasterLab (Diabetes Advocates) July 7 -8, 2015 - Orlando, FL

For anyone who is interested in learning how easy it is to raise awareness (and your voice) for diabetes advocacy, attend this program. While held in the same space as Friends for Life’s conference, it’s a separate conference. Last year’s program was amazing, and this year’s is promised to be even better!

Friends for Life July 6 - 12, 2015 Orlando, FL 

This is the de facto gold standard for any family with diabetes. It’s being held this year at Disney’s Coronado Springs Resort.

Room rates are $149 + tax. This rate is available from July 3, 2020 to July 13, 2015. You may reserve a room, buy park tickets, make Disney Dining reservations, and arrange for free Disney Transportation from the Orlando Airport to the hotel online at www.disneyurl.com/ChildrenWithDiabetes2015Conference.

2015 Practical Ways to Achieve Targets in Diabetes Care July 16, 2020 - 19, 2015 - Keystone, Colorado

While not a patient conference, worth taking a look at to see what’s being discussed. “This course is designed to help healthcare providers caring for patients with diabetes, including but not limited to, endocrinologists/diabetes specialists, internists, pediatricians, family physicians, physician assistants, medical residents, fellows, nurse practitioners, nurses, dietitians and certified diabetes educators.”

August

AADE 15 (American Association  August 5-8, 2015 - New Orleans, LA

Ernest N. Morial Convention Center. Registration will be open in March, 2015.

September

CWD Focus on Technology at the Disneyland Hotel September 18 - 20, 2015 - Anaheim, California 

51st EASD Annual Meeting September 14-18, 2015 (European Association for the Study of Diabetes) - Stockholm, Sweden

This is the European “big” medical conference, much like ADA’s Scientific Sessions.

TYOCD (Taking Control of Your Diabetes) September 26, 2015 San Diego, CA

TCOYD is a one-day program with tracks for both Type 1 and Type 2 individuals (and their friends and family, of course). Those who attend will have opportunities to learn about the latest tools, tips, techniques, and technology to help live healthier lives with diabetes. What I love about this program is that it was founded and is run by physicians who have intimate knowledge of diabetes; they have the disease! Many of the speakers also have Type 1 or Type 2 diabetes, so it’s not as if it’s a “do as I say and not as I do, because I don’t have a clue” program. If you have one coming to your area, you’re fortunate! (They’re missing the entire southeastern portion of the United States.)

October

American Diabetes Association (ADA) Expo October 10, 2015 - Minneapolis, MN

The American Diabetes Association Expo is a one-day exposition where one can peruse through exhibits and talk with professionals and those who are looking to promote items that may help people with diabetes manage the disease. There are health screens and demonstrations and is open and free for everyone. (If you know of anyone who may be at risk, bring them to one of these.)

American Diabetes Association (ADA) Expo October 17, 2015 - Houston, TX

The American Diabetes Association Expo is a one-day exposition where one can peruse through exhibits and talk with professionals and those who are looking to promote items that may help people with diabetes manage the disease. There are health screens and demonstrations and is open and free for everyone. (If you know of anyone who may be at risk, bring them to one of these.)

TYOCD (Taking Control of Your Diabetes) October 17, 2015 - Omaha, NE

TCOYD is a one-day program with tracks for both Type 1 and Type 2 individuals (and their friends and family, of course). Those who attend will have opportunities to learn about the latest tools, tips, techniques, and technology to help live healthier lives with diabetes. What I love about this program is that it was founded and is run by physicians who have intimate knowledge of diabetes; they have the disease! Many of the speakers also have Type 1 or Type 2 diabetes, so it’s not as if it’s a “do as I say and not as I do, because I don’t have a clue” program. If you have one coming to your area, you’re fortunate! (They’re missing the entire southeastern portion of the United States.)

Friends for Life Canada at the Marriott Gateway on the Falls October 23 - 25, 2015 - Niagara Falls, Ontario, Canada 

Registration is priced on a per person basis for everyone ages 5 and older. Early registration rates will be $50/person. “Please note that we expect the conference to sell out and do not plan on having on-site registration.” You must register separately for the conference and hotel. Registering for the hotel does not register your family for the conference itself.

Friends for Life UK 2015 October 30 - November 1, 2020 Old Windsor, Berkshire, UK

Note: You must register separately for the conference and hotel. Registering for the hotel does not register your family for the conference itself. Conference Registration will open in February 2015.

November

TYOCD (Taking Control of Your Diabetes) November 21, 2015 -  Glendale/Phoenix, AZ

TCOYD is a one-day program with tracks for both Type 1 and Type 2 individuals (and their friends and family, of course). Those who attend will have opportunities to learn about the latest tools, tips, techniques, and technology to help live healthier lives with diabetes. What I love about this program is that it was founded and is run by physicians who have intimate knowledge of diabetes; they have the disease! Many of the speakers also have Type 1 or Type 2 diabetes, so it’s not as if it’s a “do as I say and not as I do, because I don’t have a clue” program. If you have one coming to your area, you’re fortunate! (They’re missing the entire southeastern portion of the United States.)

World Diabetes Congress November 30 - December 4, 2020  -  Vancouver, Canada

Experts in diabetes care from around the world will exchange diabetes research and best practices. Physicians, scientists, nurses, educators and other healthcare professionals, as well as government officials, policy makers and representatives from 230 IDF Member Associations will gather to learn, discover and connect.

The WDC 2015 will coincide with the expiration of the current Millennium Development Goals and the adoption of the new Post-2015 Development Framework, a major push for expanded access to diabetes prevention, treatment and a cure.

PLEASE NOTE:

We are still waiting on dates for the Diabetes Technology Society meetings.   It is also unclear is there will be another National Conference on Mental Health Issues of Diabetes.

I did not include “invite only” conferences.

As always, there are bound to be more opportunities to meet other people with diabetes, learn about the disease, and advocate. These are just a few. As I hear of more, I’ll post them here.