The Lochte of The Diabetes Olympics

You train hard.

Sacrifice relationships, fun, career paths, life choices in order to get those medals. And you succeed. Over and over. You are the darling, the hero, the one destined for greatness.

You make a mistake.

An error in judgement. You are called out. Publicly. All that training is forgotten as you backpedal, trying to dig yourself out of a hole that is crumbling beneath your feet. You are not prepared and the next thing you know, you are at the bottom.

You are Lochted.

We compete in the Diabetes Olympics.

We train hard, seeking out coaches and help. We study others for techniques and new ways to get stronger, better, and more confident.

We have sacrificed much – career choices (I wanted to be an Air Force pilot), fun (“Let’s just sit while my blood glucose comes up.”), and life choices (“Yeah, so you need health insurance so you need to take this job you will most likely abhor.”), all to get that gold medal.

Gold Medal

That “Great A1C!” or that “Your eyes look great!” gold medal that you can proudly show to the world. All those blood glucose checks, all those medications, all that money. Some compete against others (“My A1C was 4.9%. What’s yours?” ::blank stare::), while others compete against personal bests or even ghosts of heroes past. But we are all competing.

And sometimes we Lochte.

If you aren’t honest about your diabetes management, that mistake can blow up.

Whether we lie to ourselves or our medical team or our family, that simple mistake or omission can snowball. And you can’t flee the country. Diabetes comes with you.

I have learned that the truth will out – whether it be through lab results or irrefutable evidence (Like the fact I hadn’t asked my parents to order test strips in months as a teenager, yet told them that I was checking “every day.”) Saying that you are eating well and feeling fine when your physician presents you with your latest A1C and says: “Let’s talk about how this doesn’t match what you’re saying.”

Don’t Lochte

Unlike Ryan Lochte, your diabetes management is not going to have an Olympic disaster attached to it. Your diabetes management does not have Speedo endorsing it. But he will be hard pressed to regain the public’s trust again.

By being honest and upfront about what’s going on with the people around you, even when you are exhausted and burned out, you can find support and help. (Where, you ask? Online, in person… there is a community of support. I can direct you if you’d like. Just email me at theperfectd [at] gmail.com.)

Take it from someone who Lochted a long time ago and spent time learning the hard way that being truthful about diabetes management is the best way to medal in the Diabetes Olympics… although in my case, I’m not going for the gold medal. My sights are higher than Gold.

I’m training for the Joslin Medal. 

One comment

  1. Rick Phillips

    I am training for the Joslin. I love it,

    I fear there will be no Joslin in my future, but I am always excited to root for those in the hunt. I will be excited to earn a Lilly 50 someday perhaps.

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