Hairdresser On Fire

521681_45020926Since my last diabetes medical team appointment in July, it’s been a rough blood sugar ride. Highs from the steroid injection for my frozen shoulder and lows from overcorrecting and gastric delay has me wondering what my A1C will be and if it’s back over 7.0%. Wouldn’t surprise me and it won’t upset me, as I’ve had A1Cs in the double digits. (Halloween scary double digits in my teens.) It’s an opportunity for me to up my game and work with my team to smooth out my roller coaster.

However, much like what happens when my hair stylist appointment draws closer and my hair begins to look fantastic, my readings for the past three days have been… phenomenal. Overnights have been a steady line. (Uninterrupted sleep is an amazing mood elevator.) There’s been an occasional 75, an occasional 190, but for the most part, it’s been smooth sailing.

It won’t last, I’m sure. That’s the nature of diabetes. But for now, it’s on fire…

(The title’s a nod to Morrissey, who despite being a fiend on vinyl, was terribly disappointing live. Diva.)

0 comments

  1. njd1insulin

    I play little mind games with myself and give my regime a breather in the week between blood tests and seeing my endo for results. Somehow that period of being more relaxed seems to equate to things being well managed. Must work out how to replicate that approach all year round!

  2. Patricia Schroeder

    Thanks for your honesty. Two comments: #1 Steriods definitely raise your blood sugar (and blood pressure). When I had to take oral steroids I was shocked at the effect on glucose. Someone recommended that I try the supplement ********* as it helps lower glucose particularly when you get off the steroids. So I did take it for about two weeks and it appeared to help. #2 As my A1c inched toward 7% I found a web site that really helped – it is about the five percenters, those who keep their A1c in the five percent range. The solution is really very basic. You start by pricking your finger after every meal (one hour and two hours after you eat) and logging what foods raise your readings. Then you slowly exclude or severely limit those foods. I am now a five percenter for the last year. The web site run by ******** was a revelation: *********. If you are not familiar with it, try it and you will learn a lot.

    • theperfectd

      Patricia,
      Thank you for commenting on my blog. Please be aware that I have edited three things in your comment, as I do not believe in “supplements”, promotional references, or websites that do not meet medical standards – so I don’t allow those on my blog in any format. I’ve removed those, but left everything else in your post.
      As a T1, I’m very aware of what impact steroids and foods play on my blood sugars. I’m glad that you found what works for you. Again, thanks so much!

      • Patricia Schroeder

        Thanks for your response. I too don’t normally take supplements but this particular time it was recommended by a reliable source and I was desperate to counteract the rising glucose from steroids so I tried it for two weeks. Haven’t used it since.

        As for the website I mentioned, I found a reference to it in the magazine “Diabetes Self-Management” in an impressive article entitled “Reversing Type 2 Diabetes: Can it be Done?” At the time my primary care doc assured me that my A1c readings which were climbing to 6.8% were acceptable. It looked like I was destined to keep climbing. But reading that article nine months ago opened my eyes. Using the article and a slew of websites it referenced, I made changes that brought my A1c down to 5.7% and I hope it keeps falling. Finding the right diet is unique to each person so only by pricking your finger can you find what helps you. The new thinking is that readings above 6% are not in the heart healthy range.

  3. Peggy

    I am new to your site but I feel like we could be twins separated at birth. You have just describd me and I thought I was all alone!

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